2020 Keynote speakers and presentations

Keynote speakerPresentation titleBiography
Kate BeckettEmbracing complexity and uncertainty to create impact: exploring the processes and transformative potential of co-produced research through development of a social impact model Kate Beckett (KB) co-developed the ‘Social Impact Framework’ which aims to capture multi-level, non-linear, potentially transformative impacts of research co-production. She also recently completed the ‘Enhancing Post-injury Psychological Intervention and Care (EPPIC)’ study which uses forum theatre to mobilise diverse stakeholder knowledge/improve NHS trauma care. EPPIC was funded by a UK National Institute for Health Research ‘Knowledge Mobilisation Research Fellowship.’ KB’s research draws on her clinical background in nursing/midwifery and academic training in Psychology/Anthropology. It focuses on knowledge mobilisation, psychological/physical trauma, mindlines and NHS practice and uses creative means to bring different communities together to share knowledge and catalyse change.
Michelle FarrEmbracing complexity and uncertainty to create impact: exploring the processes and transformative potential of co-produced research through development of a social impact model Michelle Farr is a qualitative health researcher who works at the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Applied Research Collaboration (ARC) West within the University of Bristol. She has 15 years experience of conducting collaborative research projects, with a strong interest in participatory and co-produced research. She has recently published resources to support the development of more equitable co-produced research, and is keen to ensure that research makes a difference to practice and policy, and challenges health inequalities.
Andrée Le MayEmbracing complexity and uncertainty to create impact: exploring the processes and transformative potential of co-produced research through development of a social impact model Andrée’s longstanding focus on research implementation and impact began in 1986 as Specialist Nurse for R&D, a role created to move research into practice across NHS professional groups, specialties and organisations. Staying close to practice through research, service development and education, she has since then taught/mentored postgraduate students in knowledge management/mobilisation, change-management and clinical leadership. Her research expertise focuses on developing and evaluating implementation techniques especially communities of practice, co-producing evidence-based practice/policy change and researching quality improvement skills. Now working as joint Implementation Lead for the NIHR East of England Applied Research Collaboration, she is Professor Emerita of Nursing at the University of Southampton, Honorary Visiting Senior Fellow at Cambridge Public Health, Editor-in-Chief for the National Institute of Health Research’s Health Services and Delivery Research, Public Health, and Programme Grants for Applied Research journals and co-editor of the Journal of Research in Nursing.
Anita KothariEmbracing complexity and uncertainty to create impact: exploring the processes and transformative potential of co-produced research through development of a social impact model Anita Kothari is a faculty member at the University of Western Ontario. Her research focuses on understanding how to best support the use of research and knowledge in healthcare decision-making; within this domain, she concentrates on integrated knowledge translation (i.e., research co-production) particularly in public health systems and services. Please see further information about her Lab (https://www.uwo.ca/fhs/kt/) and the Integrated Knowledge Translation Research Network (https://iktrn.ohri.ca/). Anita’s academic background involved training in health research methodology, population health, and health policy and services. She is a member of the College of the Royal Society of Canada.
Inna Feldman is an Associate professor in health economics in the Department of Public Health and Caring Science, Uppsala University, Sweden. She is a head of health economic unit at the research group CHAP (Child Health and Parenting). Dr. Feldman teaches courses in health economics and researches value in health care. Her area encompasses theoretical and empirical health-economics evaluations, with a particular focus on the economic evaluation of: 1) Interventions targeting mental health problems in children and adolescents, and 2) Prevention interventions targeting lifestyle choices.
Dr. Feldman continues to develop research interests related to health economics of prevention and health policy.